Рейтинг теми:
  • Голосів: 0 - Середня оцінка: 0
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
WSJ - Російська перемога на грузинських виборах
#1
Я ж попереджав - переможе Пу...Москалі

Обама стане ще гнучкішим.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872...99654.html

By JAMES KIRCHICK

Tbilisi, Georgia

On Monday, voters in the former Soviet republic of Georgia went to the polls in what international observers have called the country's most competitive and credible election in history. The results took most international observers by surprise, as the opposition Georgian Dream coalition, led by billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili, won an upset victory over the ruling party of the pro-Western, American-educated President Mikhail Saakashvili.

On Tuesday afternoon, in a televised statement with a bust of Ronald Reagan visible on the mantle behind him, Mr. Saakashvili conceded defeat and vowed to help the victors form a new government, defying the predictions of both the opposition and his detractors in the West, who have characterized him as an autocrat hiding behind a veneer of democratic rhetoric.

Yet while the vote and what seems to be the start of a peaceful transfer of power is a triumph for Georgian democracy, it is also a victory for the country's neighbor to the north: Russia, which will likely increase its sway here under the new government.

To be sure, Russia, which invaded Georgia in 2008 and still occupies 20% of its territory, was not foremost on voters' minds in this election. Among the dozens of Georgians I interviewed before the vote, not one mentioned the war with Russia or the Western orientation of Mr. Saakashvili (including aspirations to membership in NATO and the European Union) as an issue that would determine their vote. The most frequent complaint against the government was joblessness.

Despite Mr. Saakashvili's successful domestic reforms—which have drastically reduced crime and petty corruption, and have opened up the country to international business—Georgia's poverty rate remains roughly the same as when he came to power in the bloodless 2003 Rose Revolution.

While Georgia's Western ties under Mr. Saakashvili may not have been a factor in his defeat, they will nonetheless suffer as a consequence. That is because Mr. Ivanishvili, who made his fortune in Russia in the 1990s during the privatization of the post-Soviet economy, will almost certainly move to put Georgia back in Moscow's sphere of influence.

Announcing entry into Georgian politics last year, Mr. Ivanishvili promised to sell off his assets in Russia. He began selling to Russian state-owned concerns and other Kremlin-friendly businessmen, an option not afforded to oligarchs (such as Alexander Lebedev) who have run afoul of the Kremlin. One doesn't become a billionaire in Russia in the 1990s, maintain that wealth and sell those assets at a fair price without the approval of President Vladimir Putin.

Mr. Ivanishvili's means of making money aren't the only thing that point toward a reorientation of Georgia's foreign policy. Statements from him and several members of his political coalition show an affinity for Russia and an antagonism toward the United States. Georgia, Mr. Ivanishvili told the Economist last year, is less democratic than Russia (an assessment he will likely have to modify now that his coalition won elections he said his opponent would rig). Moreover, according to Mr. Ivanishvili, the Georgian government "started" the 2008 territorial war with Russia over South Ossetia.

Before the election, Mr. Ivanishvili wrote a threatening letter to the American ambassador in Tbilisi, demanding that he stop the U.S.-funded National Democratic Institute and International Republican Institute from conducting polls, as they were showing results not to his liking. Even more telling is what Mr. Ivanishvili doesn't say. He has never publicly criticized Mr. Putin, who isn't a particularly popular figure here.

More worrying are the statements from disparate members of his six-party Georgian Dream coalition, which includes many holdovers from Georgia's corrupt, post-Soviet regime and an array of discredited nationalists. Gubaz Sanikidze, a leader of the National Forum Party and member of the coalition, said in 2007 that "those who think that NATO membership is the main goal of Georgia are on the path to treason." Another coalition candidate, Suso Jachvliani, said in crude terms that Georgia had been "destroyed and ruined" by 20 years of supplication to the U.S.

In a news conference Tuesday afternoon, Mr. Ivanishvili sounded a conciliatory note toward the West: "Our strategy is NATO and moving toward NATO." But such promises sound empty when he follows them up with assertions such as: "It wasn't a matter of principle that Russia opposed us joining NATO." Mr. Ivanishvili faulted Mr. Saakashvili for making Georgia a "geopolitical player" and promised better relations with Russia, something that will only come at the expense of Georgian sovereignty as long as Mr. Putin remains in power.

Given their neighborhood and the size of their country, Georgians can't be blamed for wanting to avoid geopolitics. But putting the country's path toward NATO and the EU on the back burner could be disastrous. The liberal reforms and democratic standards required for Western integration have a positive effect on the nations in Europe's periphery. If Georgia continues along the path of the West, it could become like Poland or the Czech Republic, former Soviet satellites that are now robust democracies. If it goes the way of Russia, it will become more like Ukraine and Belarus, the former a kleptocratic, quasi-authoritarian regime, the latter a hard dictatorship.

For years, the Kremlin has tried to destabilize Georgia and remove its pro-Western government from power for having the audacity to ally itself with the West. What the Kremlin couldn't do via war it then tried to accomplish with a variety of hapless, widely reviled political figures. Only now, in the form of the billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili, has Moscow proved victorious.

Mr. Kirchick is a Berlin-based fellow with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.
Відповісти
#2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Kirchick
Відповісти
#3
Shocked 
Найгірше що Грузії навязали таку саму "політрехворму" яку проштовхували в Україні - з нового 2013 року Грузія стає парламентською республікою. А ось, наприклад Чехія - запроваджує прямі вибори Президента (досі його обирали в Парлдаменті).
Georgia, Mr. Ivanishvili told the Economist last year, is less democratic than Russia (an assessment he will likely have to modify now that his coalition won elections he said his opponent would rig). Moreover, according to Mr. Ivanishvili, the Georgian government "started" the 2008 territorial war with Russia over South Ossetia.

Before the election, Mr. Ivanishvili wrote a threatening letter to the American ambassador in Tbilisi, demanding that he stop the U.S.-funded National Democratic Institute and International Republican Institute from conducting polls, as they were showing results not to his liking. Even more telling is what Mr. Ivanishvili doesn't say. He has never publicly criticized Mr. Putin, who isn't a particularly popular figure here.

(03-10-2012, 02:42 )Hadjibei писав(ла): Я ж попереджав - переможе Пу...Москалі

Обама стане ще гнучкішим.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872...99654.html

By JAMES KIRCHICK

Tbilisi, Georgia

Given their neighborhood and the size of their country, Georgians can't be blamed for wanting to avoid geopolitics. But putting the country's path toward NATO and the EU on the back burner could be disastrous. The liberal reforms and democratic standards required for Western integration have a positive effect on the nations in Europe's periphery. If Georgia continues along the path of the West, it could become like Poland or the Czech Republic, former Soviet satellites that are now robust democracies. If it goes the way of Russia, it will become more like Ukraine and Belarus, the former a kleptocratic, quasi-authoritarian regime, the latter a hard dictatorship.

For years, the Kremlin has tried to destabilize Georgia and remove its pro-Western government from power for having the audacity to ally itself with the West. What the Kremlin couldn't do via war it then tried to accomplish with a variety of hapless, widely reviled political figures. Only now, in the form of the billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili, has Moscow proved victorious.

Mr. Kirchick is a Berlin-based fellow with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Відповісти
#4
(03-10-2012, 20:30 )Мартинюк писав(ла): Найгірше що Грузії навязали таку саму "політрехворму" яку проштовхували в Україні - з нового 2013 року Грузія стає парламентською республікою. А ось, наприклад Чехія - запроваджує прямі вибори Президента (досі його обирали в Парлдаменті).

В Чехії справді відбудуться прямі вибори президента. Однак у політичному устрої Чеської Республіки нічого не змінюється - вона так і залишатиметься парламентською республікою, ніяких додаткових повноважень президент не отримує.
Відповісти
#5

(03-10-2012, 21:48 )Kohoutek писав(ла):
(03-10-2012, 20:30 )Мартинюк писав(ла): Найгірше що Грузії навязали таку саму "політрехворму" яку проштовхували в Україні - з нового 2013 року Грузія стає парламентською республікою. А ось, наприклад Чехія - запроваджує прямі вибори Президента (досі його обирали в Парлдаменті).

В Чехії справді відбудуться прямі вибори президента. Однак у політичному устрої Чеської Республіки нічого не змінюється - вона так і залишатиметься парламентською республікою, ніяких додаткових повноважень президент не отримує.

Вибори Президента народом а не депутатами:
1. Роблять правктично неможливою його відставку до закінчення терміну повноваженнь - імпічмент є процедурою надзвичайно складною і прикладів успішного імпічменту обраних виборцями президентів дуже мало, а первиборів "парламентських" президентів - скільки завгодно.

2. Президент тсає в рази менш залежним від депутатів - хоча б тому що йому що перед виборами треба спілкуватися і щось обіцяти вже не депутатам а простим виборцям.

Зверніть увагу - це якщо не проведено навіть найменших змін у розподіл повноваженнь між урядом і Президентом. Якщо ще й щось таке зроблене ( а без цього гадаю обійтися просто неможливо) то зміни в позиціях Президента і Парламенту будуть просто разючі.
Відповісти
#6
(04-10-2012, 00:01 )Мартинюк писав(ла): Вибори Президента народом а не депутатами:
1. Роблять правктично неможливою його відставку до закінчення терміну повноваженнь - імпічмент є процедурою надзвичайно складною і прикладів успішного імпічменту обраних виборцями президентів дуже мало, а первиборів "парламентських" президентів - скільки завгодно.

Ви, мабуть, вважаєте, що обрані парламентом президенти відстороняються від влади в іншому порядку, не через імпічмент? Ви про це справді десь прочитали? Не пробували інколи перевіряти свої здогадки, які ви формулюєте чомусь як факти?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President_o...rom_office
Aside from death, there are only three things which can effect a president's removal from office:
A president can resign by notifying the Speaker of the Chamber of Deputies.
He or she may be deemed unable to execute his duties for "serious reasons" by a joint resolution of the Senate and the Chamber – although the president may appeal to the Constitutional Court have this resolution overturned.
He or she may be impeached by the Senate for high treason, and convicted by the Constitutional Court.


Цитата:2. Президент тсає в рази менш залежним від депутатів - хоча б тому що йому що перед виборами треба спілкуватися і щось обіцяти вже не депутатам а простим виборцям.

У президента в парламентській республіці так мало повноважень, що я не знаю, що він там таке може виброрцям пообіцяти за винятком чесно виконувати свої обов'язки.

Цитата:Зверніть увагу - це якщо не проведено навіть найменших змін у розподіл повноваженнь між урядом і Президентом. Якщо ще й щось таке зроблене ( а без цього гадаю обійтися просто неможливо) то зміни в позиціях Президента і Парламенту будуть просто разючі.

Не розумію, навіщо гадати, якщо можна дізнатися. Після введення прямих виборів президента в Чехії його повноваження будуть тільки зменшені:
http://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs...l-election
The Social Democrats voted in favour of the bill after coalition MPs in turn supported two of their proposals aimed at limiting the presidential powers. The president’s penal immunity will be limited to his or her time in office, and the president’s power to stop criminal prosecution will be subject to a countersignature by the prime minister or another member of the government.
Відповісти
#7
http://www.unian.net/news/528302-predsta...lstvo.html

(03-10-2012, 02:42 )Hadjibei писав(ла): Я ж попереджав - переможе Пу...Москалі

Обама стане ще гнучкішим.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872...99654.html

By JAMES KIRCHICK

Tbilisi, Georgia

On Monday, voters in the former Soviet republic of Georgia went to the polls in what international observers have called the country's most competitive and credible election in history. The results took most international observers by surprise, as the opposition Georgian Dream coalition, led by billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili, won an upset victory over the ruling party of the pro-Western, American-educated President Mikhail Saakashvili.

On Tuesday afternoon, in a televised statement with a bust of Ronald Reagan visible on the mantle behind him, Mr. Saakashvili conceded defeat and vowed to help the victors form a new government, defying the predictions of both the opposition and his detractors in the West, who have characterized him as an autocrat hiding behind a veneer of democratic rhetoric.

Yet while the vote and what seems to be the start of a peaceful transfer of power is a triumph for Georgian democracy, it is also a victory for the country's neighbor to the north: Russia, which will likely increase its sway here under the new government.

To be sure, Russia, which invaded Georgia in 2008 and still occupies 20% of its territory, was not foremost on voters' minds in this election. Among the dozens of Georgians I interviewed before the vote, not one mentioned the war with Russia or the Western orientation of Mr. Saakashvili (including aspirations to membership in NATO and the European Union) as an issue that would determine their vote. The most frequent complaint against the government was joblessness.

Despite Mr. Saakashvili's successful domestic reforms—which have drastically reduced crime and petty corruption, and have opened up the country to international business—Georgia's poverty rate remains roughly the same as when he came to power in the bloodless 2003 Rose Revolution.

While Georgia's Western ties under Mr. Saakashvili may not have been a factor in his defeat, they will nonetheless suffer as a consequence. That is because Mr. Ivanishvili, who made his fortune in Russia in the 1990s during the privatization of the post-Soviet economy, will almost certainly move to put Georgia back in Moscow's sphere of influence.

Announcing entry into Georgian politics last year, Mr. Ivanishvili promised to sell off his assets in Russia. He began selling to Russian state-owned concerns and other Kremlin-friendly businessmen, an option not afforded to oligarchs (such as Alexander Lebedev) who have run afoul of the Kremlin. One doesn't become a billionaire in Russia in the 1990s, maintain that wealth and sell those assets at a fair price without the approval of President Vladimir Putin.

Mr. Ivanishvili's means of making money aren't the only thing that point toward a reorientation of Georgia's foreign policy. Statements from him and several members of his political coalition show an affinity for Russia and an antagonism toward the United States. Georgia, Mr. Ivanishvili told the Economist last year, is less democratic than Russia (an assessment he will likely have to modify now that his coalition won elections he said his opponent would rig). Moreover, according to Mr. Ivanishvili, the Georgian government "started" the 2008 territorial war with Russia over South Ossetia.

Before the election, Mr. Ivanishvili wrote a threatening letter to the American ambassador in Tbilisi, demanding that he stop the U.S.-funded National Democratic Institute and International Republican Institute from conducting polls, as they were showing results not to his liking. Even more telling is what Mr. Ivanishvili doesn't say. He has never publicly criticized Mr. Putin, who isn't a particularly popular figure here.

More worrying are the statements from disparate members of his six-party Georgian Dream coalition, which includes many holdovers from Georgia's corrupt, post-Soviet regime and an array of discredited nationalists. Gubaz Sanikidze, a leader of the National Forum Party and member of the coalition, said in 2007 that "those who think that NATO membership is the main goal of Georgia are on the path to treason." Another coalition candidate, Suso Jachvliani, said in crude terms that Georgia had been "destroyed and ruined" by 20 years of supplication to the U.S.

In a news conference Tuesday afternoon, Mr. Ivanishvili sounded a conciliatory note toward the West: "Our strategy is NATO and moving toward NATO." But such promises sound empty when he follows them up with assertions such as: "It wasn't a matter of principle that Russia opposed us joining NATO." Mr. Ivanishvili faulted Mr. Saakashvili for making Georgia a "geopolitical player" and promised better relations with Russia, something that will only come at the expense of Georgian sovereignty as long as Mr. Putin remains in power.

Given their neighborhood and the size of their country, Georgians can't be blamed for wanting to avoid geopolitics. But putting the country's path toward NATO and the EU on the back burner could be disastrous. The liberal reforms and democratic standards required for Western integration have a positive effect on the nations in Europe's periphery. If Georgia continues along the path of the West, it could become like Poland or the Czech Republic, former Soviet satellites that are now robust democracies. If it goes the way of Russia, it will become more like Ukraine and Belarus, the former a kleptocratic, quasi-authoritarian regime, the latter a hard dictatorship.

For years, the Kremlin has tried to destabilize Georgia and remove its pro-Western government from power for having the audacity to ally itself with the West. What the Kremlin couldn't do via war it then tried to accomplish with a variety of hapless, widely reviled political figures. Only now, in the form of the billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili, has Moscow proved victorious.

Mr. Kirchick is a Berlin-based fellow with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Відповісти
#8
При двухпалатному парламенті і парламентаризм не такий дебільний як у нас . А у нас - пропагувати і проштовхувати "однопалатний парламентаризм " могли лише клінічні дебіли і закінчені паскуди.
Тому в Чехії - все буде по іншому аніж в Україні - дві палати парламенту в таких державах ефектично витрачають надлишок агресії та амбіцій на тпротистояння одна з одною. Тому Президет як правило виступає арбітром у їхніх суперчках ( які часто сам і провкує). Наваіть якщо він вибраний одною чи двома палатами цього Парламенту. Однак виборність його парламентом тсаить його під загрозу відставки голосами тимх же депутатів. Виборність його простим виборцями дає йому карт-бланш діяти незалежно протягом всього терміну обрання.

(04-10-2012, 09:49 )Kohoutek писав(ла):
(04-10-2012, 00:01 )Мартинюк писав(ла): Вибори Президента народом а не депутатами:
1. Роблять правктично неможливою його відставку до закінчення терміну повноваженнь - імпічмент є процедурою надзвичайно складною і прикладів успішного імпічменту обраних виборцями президентів дуже мало, а первиборів "парламентських" президентів - скільки завгодно.

Ви, мабуть, вважаєте, що обрані парламентом президенти відстороняються від влади в іншому порядку, не через імпічмент? Ви про це справді десь прочитали? Не пробували інколи перевіряти свої здогадки, які ви формулюєте чомусь як факти?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/President_o...rom_office
Aside from death, there are only three things which can effect a president's removal from office:
A president can resign by notifying the Speaker of the Chamber of Deputies.
He or she may be deemed unable to execute his duties for "serious reasons" by a joint resolution of the Senate and the Chamber – although the president may appeal to the Constitutional Court have this resolution overturned.
He or she may be impeached by the Senate for high treason, and convicted by the Constitutional Court.


Цитата:2. Президент тсає в рази менш залежним від депутатів - хоча б тому що йому що перед виборами треба спілкуватися і щось обіцяти вже не депутатам а простим виборцям.

У президента в парламентській республіці так мало повноважень, що я не знаю, що він там таке може виброрцям пообіцяти за винятком чесно виконувати свої обов'язки.

Цитата:Зверніть увагу - це якщо не проведено навіть найменших змін у розподіл повноваженнь між урядом і Президентом. Якщо ще й щось таке зроблене ( а без цього гадаю обійтися просто неможливо) то зміни в позиціях Президента і Парламенту будуть просто разючі.

Не розумію, навіщо гадати, якщо можна дізнатися. Після введення прямих виборів президента в Чехії його повноваження будуть тільки зменшені:
http://www.radio.cz/en/section/curraffrs...l-election
The Social Democrats voted in favour of the bill after coalition MPs in turn supported two of their proposals aimed at limiting the presidential powers. The president’s penal immunity will be limited to his or her time in office, and the president’s power to stop criminal prosecution will be subject to a countersignature by the prime minister or another member of the government.

Відповісти
#9
(08-10-2012, 16:12 )Мартинюк писав(ла): Однак виборність його парламентом тсаить його під загрозу відставки голосами тимх же депутатів. Виборність його простим виборцями дає йому карт-бланш діяти незалежно протягом всього терміну обрання.

Будь ласка, вдумайтеся в слова, які я зараз напишу:
Президент - що в президентській, що в парламентській республіці - може бути відсторонений від влади ТІЛЬКИ ГОЛОСАМИ ДЕПУТАТІВ ПАРЛАМЕНТУ шляхом процедури імпічменту. Незалежно від того, хто його обрав.
Відповісти
#10
Низка високопоставлених грузинських чиновників, зокрема колишній міністр внутрішніх справ Грузії Бачо Ахалая і заступник міністра оборони Дата Ахалая, спішно залишили країну.
Про це повідомляє Лента.ру з посиланням на грузинські ЗМІ. Зокрема, за їхніми даними, брати Ахалая виїхали з Грузії в ніч на неділю, 7 жовтня. Повідомляється, що візи й закордонні паспорти для силовиків привезли безпосередньо в будівлю міністерства оборони. Звідти брати роз'їхалися на різних автомобілях. Куди вони виїхали, не уточнюється. Керівник прес-служби міноборони Грузії Ніно Потржебська не змогла ні підтвердити, ні спростувати цю інформацію.
Також, із посиланням на повідомлення в соціальних мережах, повідомляється про те, що з Грузії виїхали високопоставлений поліцейський чиновник Мегіс Кардава і міністр юстиції Зураб Адеїшвілі. За даними "Эха Москвы", країну також залишили екс-міністр оборони Давид Кезерашвілі й голова парламентського комітету з національної безпеки минулого скликання Гіві Таргамадзе.

http://www.unian.ua/news/528681-zmi-gruz...ajinu.html
Відповісти
#11
Angry 
теж, звісно, на щось посилаються...
(08-10-2012, 16:54 )Sviatoslav D писав(ла): Про це повідомляє Лента.ру з посиланням на грузинські ЗМІ. Зокрема, за їхніми даними, брати Ахалая виїхали з Грузії в ніч на неділю, 7 жовтня.

Праблема людзей, якія лічаць, што беларусы, расейцы ды ўкраінцы — адзін народ, у тым, што яны ня могуць гэтага сказаць ані па-беларуску, ані па-ўкраінску.
Відповісти
#12
Question 
(08-10-2012, 16:54 )Sviatoslav D писав(ла): Низка високопоставлених грузинських чиновників, зокрема колишній міністр внутрішніх справ Грузії Бачо Ахалая і заступник міністра оборони Дата Ахалая, спішно залишили країну.
Про це повідомляє Лента.ру з посиланням на грузинські ЗМІ. Зокрема, за їхніми даними, брати Ахалая виїхали з Грузії в ніч на неділю, 7 жовтня. Повідомляється, що візи й закордонні паспорти для силовиків привезли безпосередньо в будівлю міністерства оборони. Звідти брати роз'їхалися на різних автомобілях. Куди вони виїхали, не уточнюється. Керівник прес-служби міноборони Грузії Ніно Потржебська не змогла ні підтвердити, ні спростувати цю інформацію.
Також, із посиланням на повідомлення в соціальних мережах, повідомляється про те, що з Грузії виїхали високопоставлений поліцейський чиновник Мегіс Кардава і міністр юстиції Зураб Адеїшвілі. За даними "Эха Москвы", країну також залишили екс-міністр оборони Давид Кезерашвілі й голова парламентського комітету з національної безпеки минулого скликання Гіві Таргамадзе.

http://www.unian.ua/news/528681-zmi-gruz...ajinu.html

Відповісти
#13
Ну там Мубарака ще, Кучму також колись хотіли. Ви спеціально все так спрощуєте чи дійсно в це вірите ? Невже не бачите різниці у величезної кількості процедур і лобістських повязаннь, які супровджують будь яке важливе рішення на верхах?.
(08-10-2012, 16:38 )Kohoutek писав(ла):
(08-10-2012, 16:12 )Мартинюк писав(ла): Однак виборність його парламентом тсаить його під загрозу відставки голосами тимх же депутатів. Виборність його простим виборцями дає йому карт-бланш діяти незалежно протягом всього терміну обрання.

Будь ласка, вдумайтеся в слова, які я зараз напишу:
Президент - що в президентській, що в парламентській республіці - може бути відсторонений від влади ТІЛЬКИ ГОЛОСАМИ ДЕПУТАТІВ ПАРЛАМЕНТУ шляхом процедури імпічменту. Незалежно від того, хто його обрав.
Угу - і ще президенти і там і там можуть померти від пострілу кіллера та серцевої недостатності. Тільки в одних чомусть частіше від першого, а в других від другого .

Відповісти
#14
Smile 
Smile http://blogs.pravda.com.ua/authors/shrik...438cc93e9/
(08-10-2012, 18:04 )Koala писав(ла): теж, звісно, на щось посилаються...
(08-10-2012, 16:54 )Sviatoslav D писав(ла): Про це повідомляє Лента.ру з посиланням на грузинські ЗМІ. Зокрема, за їхніми даними, брати Ахалая виїхали з Грузії в ніч на неділю, 7 жовтня.

Відповісти
#15
Потеря Грузии – предупреждение для Латвии
("IR", Латвия)
Айварс Озолиньш (Aivars Ozoliņš)

Читати далі http://inosmi.ru/caucasus/20121008/20054...z28o72NFOI




(03-10-2012, 02:42 )Hadjibei писав(ла): Я ж попереджав - переможе Пу...Москалі

Обама стане ще гнучкішим.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872...99654.html

By JAMES KIRCHICK

Tbilisi, Georgia

On Monday, voters in the former Soviet republic of Georgia went to the polls in what international observers have called the country's most competitive and credible election in history. The results took most international observers by surprise, as the opposition Georgian Dream coalition, led by billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili, won an upset victory over the ruling party of the pro-Western, American-educated President Mikhail Saakashvili.

On Tuesday afternoon, in a televised statement with a bust of Ronald Reagan visible on the mantle behind him, Mr. Saakashvili conceded defeat and vowed to help the victors form a new government, defying the predictions of both the opposition and his detractors in the West, who have characterized him as an autocrat hiding behind a veneer of democratic rhetoric.

Yet while the vote and what seems to be the start of a peaceful transfer of power is a triumph for Georgian democracy, it is also a victory for the country's neighbor to the north: Russia, which will likely increase its sway here under the new government.

To be sure, Russia, which invaded Georgia in 2008 and still occupies 20% of its territory, was not foremost on voters' minds in this election. Among the dozens of Georgians I interviewed before the vote, not one mentioned the war with Russia or the Western orientation of Mr. Saakashvili (including aspirations to membership in NATO and the European Union) as an issue that would determine their vote. The most frequent complaint against the government was joblessness.

Despite Mr. Saakashvili's successful domestic reforms—which have drastically reduced crime and petty corruption, and have opened up the country to international business—Georgia's poverty rate remains roughly the same as when he came to power in the bloodless 2003 Rose Revolution.

While Georgia's Western ties under Mr. Saakashvili may not have been a factor in his defeat, they will nonetheless suffer as a consequence. That is because Mr. Ivanishvili, who made his fortune in Russia in the 1990s during the privatization of the post-Soviet economy, will almost certainly move to put Georgia back in Moscow's sphere of influence.

Announcing entry into Georgian politics last year, Mr. Ivanishvili promised to sell off his assets in Russia. He began selling to Russian state-owned concerns and other Kremlin-friendly businessmen, an option not afforded to oligarchs (such as Alexander Lebedev) who have run afoul of the Kremlin. One doesn't become a billionaire in Russia in the 1990s, maintain that wealth and sell those assets at a fair price without the approval of President Vladimir Putin.

Mr. Ivanishvili's means of making money aren't the only thing that point toward a reorientation of Georgia's foreign policy. Statements from him and several members of his political coalition show an affinity for Russia and an antagonism toward the United States. Georgia, Mr. Ivanishvili told the Economist last year, is less democratic than Russia (an assessment he will likely have to modify now that his coalition won elections he said his opponent would rig). Moreover, according to Mr. Ivanishvili, the Georgian government "started" the 2008 territorial war with Russia over South Ossetia.

Before the election, Mr. Ivanishvili wrote a threatening letter to the American ambassador in Tbilisi, demanding that he stop the U.S.-funded National Democratic Institute and International Republican Institute from conducting polls, as they were showing results not to his liking. Even more telling is what Mr. Ivanishvili doesn't say. He has never publicly criticized Mr. Putin, who isn't a particularly popular figure here.

More worrying are the statements from disparate members of his six-party Georgian Dream coalition, which includes many holdovers from Georgia's corrupt, post-Soviet regime and an array of discredited nationalists. Gubaz Sanikidze, a leader of the National Forum Party and member of the coalition, said in 2007 that "those who think that NATO membership is the main goal of Georgia are on the path to treason." Another coalition candidate, Suso Jachvliani, said in crude terms that Georgia had been "destroyed and ruined" by 20 years of supplication to the U.S.

In a news conference Tuesday afternoon, Mr. Ivanishvili sounded a conciliatory note toward the West: "Our strategy is NATO and moving toward NATO." But such promises sound empty when he follows them up with assertions such as: "It wasn't a matter of principle that Russia opposed us joining NATO." Mr. Ivanishvili faulted Mr. Saakashvili for making Georgia a "geopolitical player" and promised better relations with Russia, something that will only come at the expense of Georgian sovereignty as long as Mr. Putin remains in power.

Given their neighborhood and the size of their country, Georgians can't be blamed for wanting to avoid geopolitics. But putting the country's path toward NATO and the EU on the back burner could be disastrous. The liberal reforms and democratic standards required for Western integration have a positive effect on the nations in Europe's periphery. If Georgia continues along the path of the West, it could become like Poland or the Czech Republic, former Soviet satellites that are now robust democracies. If it goes the way of Russia, it will become more like Ukraine and Belarus, the former a kleptocratic, quasi-authoritarian regime, the latter a hard dictatorship.

For years, the Kremlin has tried to destabilize Georgia and remove its pro-Western government from power for having the audacity to ally itself with the West. What the Kremlin couldn't do via war it then tried to accomplish with a variety of hapless, widely reviled political figures. Only now, in the form of the billionaire Bidzina Ivanishvili, has Moscow proved victorious.

Mr. Kirchick is a Berlin-based fellow with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies.

Відповісти
#16
Як передає ІА «Новини Грузії», після зустрічі з Президентом Грузії Б.Іванішвілі заявив про збіг думок щодо зовнішньої політики, в питаннях подальшого зближення Грузії з НАТО і ЄС. "У цьому плані у нас збіг думок. Наша стратегія - європейська і євроатлантична інтеграція", - сказав Б.Іванішвілі журналістам, наголосивши, що через деякий час Грузія обов'язково стане членом НАТО.
Більше читайте тут: http://www.unian.ua/news/529058-nova-vla...-nato.html
Відповісти


Схожі теми
Тема: Автор Відповідей Переглядів: Ост. повідомлення
  Брати участь у виборах є особистим обов'язком кожного громадянина. hrushka 3 290 30-03-2019, 16:56
Ост. повідомлення: hrushka
  Місяць по виборах у Польщі Slavix 21 2238 29-03-2019, 10:46
Ост. повідомлення: Николай Шевченко
  Перемога! українець віддубасив негра у Канаді Torr 0 360 02-12-2018, 21:49
Ост. повідомлення: Torr

Перейти до форуму: